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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 231 (some duplicates have been removed)
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have tourists back in people in the city. >> host: ken budd, what were you doing for a living prior to volunteering? >> guest: i was an editor and i was an editor in washington dc and i am still doing the same job. >> host: how did you get all that time off? could use your vacation time. >> guest: yes, i use
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
business bureau. fraud was so rampant in the wake of hurricane katrina in 2005 the government created a disaster fraud team which is said to have prosecuted nearly 1,500 people involved with running scams related to katrina and rita. meanwhile, countless americans are opening their wallets to victims of the superstorm. about $11.4 million so far has been donated to the red cross, two days after the storm. that's more than the $8 million donated after hurricane isaac. a music telethon dedicated to sandy and led by bruce springsteen, bon jovi and billy joel will air on nbc tonight. climate change failed to become a major headline story in the presidential election... until now. in the aftermath of hurricane sandy, new york mayor michael bloomberg noted the summer drought, melting ice caps and rising temputures as reasons to take action on climate change. then on thursday in a stunning move, bloomberg endorsed president obama, citing his record on climate change issues such as raising fuel emissions standards. meanwhile, gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan suggests taking another
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
. >> eric: may i bring -- >> bob -- holdon. >> kimberly: by the way, what happened to bush and katrina? did they do the same thing? it's okay there, but not here. being politically expedient again? >> bob: there are 77 people dead. romney and his people talk about how obama was not prepared. >> greg: you talk about climate change. >> eric: let me do this. i'll bring this back to why i put the two things in the same segment, bob. here is why. we gave him $1 trillion. the administration $1 trillion to beef up the infrastructure. they spent $1 trillion making the grid. burying the grid underground so that every time it's 50-mile-per-hour wind we don't have half the country losing power. that would have been a good use of stimulus money. better use. >> bob: bury new jersey under the ground in four years? >> eric: let me put it this way. $1 trillion closer to getting it done. what did we get with the money we spent? >> kimberly: nothing. >> bob: republicans have to think of something besides sandy to make a case in the final four days. >> greg: that is the point. >> dana: romney did not. what he
franklin. after katrina, you were a native of new orleans, you were appointed the vice chairman of the louisiana recovery authority and the job was to handle funds that were being disbursed by the federal government. in watching the rebuilding of new orleans and this whole process, what do you think that you learned that applies to what's going on now in new york and new jersey? >> three things. first of all, leadership matters. if you look at what's happening in new york and new jersey now organization view great leaders, michael bloomberg, deputy mayor bob steele, governor cuomo, governor chris christie. the president, obama, has been very involved. when we went through katrina, we were all back down in new orleans, it wasn't that strong of leadership. ray nagin was the mayor, sometimes not to be found. so i saw the importance of people who take charge and say i'm going to run into this crisis and i'm going to help solve it. secondly, it reminded us that we're all in the same boat together. this election is somewhat about the age-old tension between, all right, we're all indiv
through hurricane katrina know a thing or two about getting back on your feet. so, hundreds of them packed up and drove east to staten island, new york, to help those recovering from superstorm sandy. they say they're just returning the kindness that so many new yorkers showed them in their time of need. dan bowens of wnyw has more. >> new york, staten island, sandy ruined hundreds of homes and we found volunteers working hard to pick up the pieces. >> and the water height is where this is. >> flood waters reached above the windows inside randy's house and several people he didn't know helped him clear out the debris. >> touching, heart warming is not near enough a ward to describe how you feel when these things are going on. and people tyke time out of their life. >> and the neighbor was feeling overwelcomed, debris everywhere in the back yard and then this group just showed up and started cleaning. >> without the 25 hands with me, i wouldn't be able to do anything. >> among the hundreds of workers and volunteers, who come to staten island today and there are hundreds assisting with the c
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
paid a price katrina, and this president built it back up again, but not political people in, bupeople who knew what to is papaying off this week. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the candidates. utech president obama pushihing effort and the the vehicle to coordinate the effort, and you saying hey last year rid of femema enter the back to theties which shows no appreciation for the role that plays during that time of agedy. >> it is a nightmare for romney. >> it is,, especially if you are after women voters in ohio, the so-called waitress vote. th is an ad for a president who worries aut you. terrible for romney, and it stopped his momentum. polls are wrong and win anyway, but just ,ooking at the polls right now a.ma has got >> did romney have momentum, or was that just republicans been? >> he had the momentum after the first t debate and he decimated the lead -- >> but we have had three since --n >> but obama was never able to recapture the lead. >> i cannot say with certainty that there was momentum,o momentum. onok at the polls evy hour a sense, and you get .hat
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
and there is a lot of suffering this is our hurricane katrina. we really felt like we were being ignored. the rest of the country was seeing something, but it wasn't us. that dramatically started to chan yesterday and certainly today with secretary napolitano coming, the national ceo of the red cross. >> no doubt. the boots will stop hitting the ground, whether it is the red cross and fema. fema was knocking on doors. [talking over each other] neil: what were they doing when they were knocking on doors? >> giving people desperately needed information and letting them know wat the processes and there were inspectors looking at how to assees the damage to the people can start to get some funding so they can start replacing in putting together their lives. going door-to-door is tremely important. a lot of things that happened today that, you know, need desperately to be done. we are still hurttng. it is a tremendous amount to be done. there are a lot of people are looking for answers and still haven't been gone through. the only backslapping that there should be at all is from the volunteers of the s
melbourn msnbc contributor, katrina vanden hoover and former rnc starm the notorious michael steele. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the whit
government has stepped in to help. this is the third hurricane i've covered in my lifetime, andrew, katrina and now this. we are at the point where the population gets furious and they turn on the government. the government can just not handle the huge, huge logistical requirements that happen after a storm like this. could this actually turn on the president at some point here? >> reporter: i don't think so. i think what the president has had the opportunity to do is show americans that he was involved in an effort that the country was rallying behind and do his job in a way that got praise by the keynote speaker at the republican convention, chris christie, very tough critic of the president otherwise. so i don't think many voters are going to blame president obama for what's going on right now, and leave aside the fact that the states in which the difficulties are occurring db new york, new jersey, connecticut are all reliantly democratic states. what is much more important to the outcome of this election, michelle, is what's going on behind me at this afl-cio phone bank where union volu
katrina devastated new orleans, it seems all the relevant agencies were ready this time, up to speed, especially fema, the federal emergency management agency, that was criticized in 2005 being widely lauded now. the president himself was up all night from monday to tuesday in the situation room in the white house monitoring the situation. now he is touring the disaster areas, especially in new jersey, so he seemed very much concerned and seemed to do everything he could to help the people. he has been applauded even by republican competitors for this. one of his harshest critics has always been new jersey governor chris christie, and this man said that obama was doing an outstanding job. >> elections are right around the corner next week, and campaigns have resumed. it is a difficult question to ask, but who has actually profited from the situation? >> for mitt romney, it is a difficult situation because national disaster times are times when politics are supposed to be put aside, so campaigning too early might hurt him, but it is the only thing he can do because he does not have an
and then paid the price after katrina, and this president put it back up again and what not political people in, and it is paying off this week, it really is paying off. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the two candidates. here you have president obama citing fema as the vehicle to coordinate the federal effort, and you had mitt romney last year on the campaign saying he would get rid of fema, he would turn the responsibilities back to the states, showing no appreciation for the role that fema place. >> this is a nightmare for political candidate romney. >> it is, especially if you are going after swing votes, woman voters in ohio, the so-called waitress a vote. they want a president who will care for them and be a guardian. this is an ad for a president who worries about you. it is terrible for romney. it stopped his momentum. maybe the polls or all wrong and romney is going to win anyway, but if you looking at the polls right now, obama has got it. >> did ghani have momentum, was that republican --romney of momentum, or was that republican spin? >> he definitely add momentu
katrina, we did hear similar noise with about, well, we shouldn't rebuild the lower 9th ward. in fact, there was never a sweeping federal policy to avoid rebuilding the lower 9th ward and it's been partially rebuilt and a lot of home owners privately made decisions, it's appropriate. on their own, i don't wish to continue with this, i can't do that again. and i think that's probably do something similar here. and let them make their own decisions and don come in with sweeping policies and create some defenses from new york like colin has, you should not oversimplify oversweeping decisions here. >> weigh in on this, relocate or rebuild. >> there's a couple of interesting points that you brought up. one, if we allow the the government to dictate where people live. where does it stop? are they not allowed to live in the middle of the country in tornado alley, not allowed to live in california where their house could be consumed by a forest fire not allowed to live along the shores of the mississippi in case it floods. one, the government should stay out of it, but there has to be some co
katrina. >> now a health study out links flu during pregnancy to autism. the study by researchers in denmark and the cdc looked at 97,000 children 8 to 14. researchers say mothers who reported having the flu during pregnancy were twice as likely to have a child with autism as those who did not report having the flu. the study does not suggest high fever or flu causes autism, many experts say there the correlation reinforces recommendation that all pregnant women should get the flu shot. >>> another study says children have higher risk of being hyperactive if their mothers constantly used a cell phone during pregnancy exposure during pregnancy impact fetal brain development and may cause hyperactivity that was the case in mice. memory was slightly decreased. >>> contra costa county health officials gearing up to convince smokers to quit for good this week during the 37th annual great american smoke-out. health services will offer it cans that include stress balls, cinnamon sticks and coupons for products that help smokers kick the habit. also lung screenings to detect early onset l
? please come forward. >> i'm katrina, on the board of the alamo square neighborhood association. i wanted to confirm dennis's comment that we are very supportive of this. we have been following it closely. we are excited we are going to get a new irrigation system and conserve more water and will work closely with community who's communicate what is going on as the various stages happen and make that go more smoothly. we are meeting with the project manager, marvin ye, and talking about how this will affect replanting and tree removal. what we can do to really take our park to the next level. and make good decisions now as this is designed so we can have a beautiful park in 100 years. thank you. >> thank you. >> any other public comment on this item? >> good morning, commissioners. thank you for having this item on your agenda today. my name is gus hernandez, editor of the alamo square news letter. i also want to offer my support for this irrigation plant, long overdue. like commissioner bonia said. you know, we are very excited about . this we are going to be partnering with your departm
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 231 (some duplicates have been removed)